bims-resufa Biomed news
on Respiratory supercomplex factors
Issue of 2019‒01‒06
two papers selected by
Vera Strogolova
Marquette University


  1. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 2019 Jan;26(1): 50-57
    Rathore S, Berndtsson J, Marin-Buera L, Conrad J, Carroni M, Brzezinski P, Ott M.
      Respiratory chain complexes execute energy conversion by connecting electron transport with proton translocation over the inner mitochondrial membrane to fuel ATP synthesis. Notably, these complexes form multi-enzyme assemblies known as respiratory supercomplexes. Here we used single-particle cryo-EM to determine the structures of the yeast mitochondrial respiratory supercomplexes III2IV and III2IV2, at 3.2-Å and 3.5-Å resolutions, respectively. We revealed the overall architecture of the supercomplex, which deviates from the previously determined assemblies in mammals; obtained a near-atomic structure of the yeast complex IV; and identified the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions implicated in supercomplex formation. Take together, our results demonstrate convergent evolution of supercomplexes in mitochondria that, while building similar assemblies, results in substantially different arrangements and structural solutions to support energy conversion.
    DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1038/s41594-018-0169-7
  2. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 2019 Jan;26(1): 78-83
    Hartley AM, Lukoyanova N, Zhang Y, Cabrera-Orefice A, Arnold S, Meunier B, Pinotsis N, Maréchal A.
      Cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV, CIV) is known in mammals to exist independently or in association with other respiratory proteins to form supercomplexes (SCs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CIV is found solely in an SC with cytochrome bc1 (complex III, CIII). Here, we present the cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of S. cerevisiae CIV in a III2IV2 SC at 3.3 Å resolution. While overall similarity to mammalian homologs is high, we found notable differences in the supernumerary subunits Cox26 and Cox13; the latter exhibits a unique arrangement that precludes CIV dimerization as seen in bovine. A conformational shift in the matrix domain of Cox5A-involved in allosteric inhibition by ATP-may arise from its association with CIII. The CIII-CIV arrangement highlights a conserved interaction interface of CIII, albeit one occupied by complex I in mammalian respirasomes. We discuss our findings in the context of the potential impact of SC formation on CIV regulation.
    DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1038/s41594-018-0172-z